Saturday, April 19, 2014

(Source: wavecaps)

(Source: sizvideos)

I love camp because it’s the only place I know where you can look up at the stars and feel totally insignificant, but then you look down at a girl’s face and realize you never will be.

Ghost (paraphrased from memory, but still the same idea)

I honestly cannot think of any better way to put the feeling of being a camp counselor into words.

(via freedomoftheforest)

Every once and a while, a bunch of notes pops up on this post. It warms my heart to know that other people are as touched by these words as I was the first time I heard them. So much has changed in the past two years since that night. Tears, smiles, pain, and joy…memories I’ll cherish and people I’ll never forget. Yet still these words remain as one of the most simple facts I’ve come to know. There’s a reason a piece of my heart will always stay at camp.

(via freedomoftheforest)
 Last messages from Survivors and Students trapped inside the ferry
... PRAY FOR SOUTH KOREA

(Source: sehunphilia)

Friday, April 18, 2014

bikinipowerbottom:

"She’s really pretty for a black girl"

image


“He’s really cool for a gay guy”

image


“She’s doing really well for a woman”

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healingthroughrunning:

The Motherland

healingthroughrunning:

The Motherland

(Source: kcesliv-irot)

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Friday, April 11, 2014
humansofnewyork:

"I teach fourth grade in Harlem.""What’s your greatest struggle as a teacher?""I worry a lot about the kids.""Why’s that?""Not all the kids. Just the ones that aren’t on the ‘college track.’ Many of them just don’t have a culture of expectation at home, and it’s hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation. I actually just finished going to a trombone recital for a former student of mine. I used to coach him in hockey on weekends. He’d practice with me from 4 AM to 6 AM. Then he’d go practice trombone from 8 to 10. He did all this just so he could get into a good high school. That’s what it takes, really. Hard to do without a culture of expectation."

humansofnewyork:

"I teach fourth grade in Harlem."
"What’s your greatest struggle as a teacher?"
"I worry a lot about the kids."
"Why’s that?"
"Not all the kids. Just the ones that aren’t on the ‘college track.’ Many of them just don’t have a culture of expectation at home, and it’s hard work to lift yourself out of an underprivileged situation. I actually just finished going to a trombone recital for a former student of mine. I used to coach him in hockey on weekends. He’d practice with me from 4 AM to 6 AM. Then he’d go practice trombone from 8 to 10. He did all this just so he could get into a good high school. That’s what it takes, really. Hard to do without a culture of expectation."